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The Necklace Guide

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Necklaces L-R: Pom Pom Tassel Necklace, Tassel Necklace, Rainbow Tassel Necklace, Starburst Necklace and Starlight Necklace

Spring is here - honest - and, tragically for me and my fellow scarf addicts, it's almost the end of scarf season (ok, not quite, but you might not need one every day). If you're someone, like me, who relies on their scarf to give an outfit a splash of colour or an extra layer of interest, the arrival of spring can herald a tricky time in style terms, as you scrabble around for a replacement as effortless as the scarf but without its now-unnecessary bulk and warmth.

Step forward, the necklace. Wearable, simple and stylish, the right necklace can give an outfit that final finishing touch that makes it look effortlessly put together rather than 'I only had one clean pair of jeans and a tshirt'. But what makes the right necklace for you? I've put together some of my top necklace tips to help you choose your best necklace and style it perfectly this spring.

Short or long?

Necklace length is usually the first accessorising question my clients ask. Should it be long, short, in between, or left at home on the dressing table? Not the latter, certainly. The answer is a combination of both environment and your style.

In terms of dress code, the answer is fairly simple - for more formal occasions (a smarter office environment or function) a short necklace is a safer option and will be more in keeping with the spoken or unspoken dress code. For more casual occasions, longer and shorter (or both - on which more in a moment) can both work well, but a longer necklace definitely carries a more relaxed, off duty air.

Of course, you also need to think about what suits your personal style, rather than solely generic rules about dress code. If you love a statement necklace for adding interest to your outfit and have a more casual or statement personal style, a long necklace can add interest and texture to an outfit. If you feel like long necklaces reach to your belly button and leave you looking cluttered and messy, and you have a snappier, neater personal style, stick with a shorter ones.

Add a splash

Colour or metal, that is the question? Again, this comes down to both personal style and dress code.

If you are in a very formal environment, a simple silver or gold necklace can really finish off an outfit without being overly challenging. If you have a warm skintone, stick with gold toned jewellery, while cool tones look better in silver. More neutral skintone? Go for a mixed metal necklace and enjoy the best of all worlds. Likewise, if your look is more minimalist or classic, you may feel more comfortable with a simple silver or gold necklace to add interest without layering up too many colours and textures.

For a more relaxed look, or a finish to an outfit that feels more statement (often replacing that beloved chunky winter scarf), a brightly coloured necklace is ideal. I am completely in love with the tassel pompom necklaces at Kettlewell this season, but if you want something a little subtler, go for the rainbow tassel necklace. Whatever your weapon, choose a colour that harmonises with the rest of your outfit and provides that all important splash of colour that will brighten up your day.

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Layer up

I love layered necklaces, and it feels like a very current way to finish off an outfit. It's undoubtedly a more relaxed finish than just one single strand, but layering up necklaces of different lengths and textures adds a finishing touch that just feels that bit more interesting and thoughtful. Make sure your necklaces all have the same silhouette - either pendant (coming to a v shape at the front if your neck) or simple strand (a circle or U shape at the front of your neck). And layer at least two completely different lengths and mix metals with colour.

Whatever you choose, repeat after me. The necklace is spring/summer's answer to the scarf.

Olwen on Mar 31, 2018 8:14 PM

Would love to see a bold bangle and matching earrings in seasonal shades. Perhaps a filigree effect where the lining or beads could be changed with each new collection ....